Never Work for Free

As a writer, I’m approached quite a bit by people that seem to think I’m looking for opportunities to give my work and talent away pro bono (for free).

Their argument usually goes something like this – if I give them my time, energy, and talent I will gain value down the road by showcasing what I have done for them for nothing. It will give me business and attract future paying commissions for my work.

It could not be further from the truth, and here’s why.

Unless I can point to a real, tangible payoff to giving away my labor and efforts there is absolutely no reason or point to my doing so. Furthermore, that whole “showcasing what I have done for them” stuff that’s supposed to attract business for me as a freelancer will most assuredly work for me – in a negative fashion.

It will bring out additional leeches who will want me to continue to offer blood, toil, tears, and sweat totally free because I will gain even more exposure of my talents through them for future business in the sweet by-and-by. After all, haven’t I already set a precedent by giving away my work to that prior “client”?

So, if you are a writer, painter, or similar professional in your field – beware the lure of the silver tongued client who wants you to work for free.

It costs them nothing, but may cost you a great deal down the road.

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John Lewis is a freelance writer and editor for hire. Reach him at jlewisauthor@outlook.com . He writes for the site Crowdfunding Hell. To see his write-ups on LinkedIn, join the group Products In Search of A Market. On Facebook, join Products in Search of a Market (Facebook).

Image: Creative commons https://goo.gl/images/Dp4zNw

Overcoming the Insurmountable

[Also appears on LinkedIn]

There are a lot of people out in the world that think what I do is impossible.

I’m disabled, you see. My entire right side is partially paralyzed (the long Latin word for it is hemiparesis), so I don’t have quite the mobility most folks do. Can’t complain, though – there are others far worse off than I am who would gladly have my limitations.

Strange, I suppose, to not think of myself as disabled. Mostly the inner dialogue is that of someone coming to terms with a long recovery from an illness. The kind that you eventually stop having others care for you, and you start caring for yourself again. It’s where I’m at now.

Now, some folks would wonder at this point just what a partially paralyzed person can do.

Consider the following:

-I live alone, so all the household chores are done by me;

-Meals are not all pre-fab frozen dinners. I love making fresh biscuits and hamburgers, for example. Baking cakes, too;

-All my writing? I do it as (no jokes please) a one-handed typist and researcher – every single day;

..and the list goes on. Don’t think that I don’t ask for help now and then, as I know my limits. Don’t you do the same? You who have regular mobility?

Looks like we’re not so different after all. You ask for help sometimes, too.

The same should apply to any work I do. I’m a writer, not a runner. Sure, you might have to bend things a bit to help me out some on the job, but you’re hiring me for my brain, not to round out your marathon team. The grey matter inside the head still works fine, thank you – just ask Hawking.

So stop thinking a disabled person can’t do a job. We know our limitations, and we’ll let you know when the job’s beyond them. Sure, maybe we can’t run, or kneel, or any one of a myriad of things a fully mobile person can do.

But the work we can do? It’s not insurmountable at all.

Try me, or any of us, and see.

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John Lewis is a freelance writer and editor for hire. Reach him at jlewis@aqualifeadventures.com . To see more of his product write-ups on LinkedIn, join the group Products In Search of A Market . On Facebook, join Products in Search of a Market (Facebook). He also writes for the site Crowdfunding Hell.

Yes, I Can’t Tell You

Can’t go into any detail right now, but an in-depth research assignment has landed in my lap that looks very interesting. Should take about two months to complete, if all goes well.

All I CAN say is that – I can’t say anything.

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John Lewis is a freelance writer and editor for hire. Reach him at jlewis@aqualifeadventures.com . To see more of his product write-ups on LinkedIn, join the group Products In Search of A Market . On Facebook, join Products in Search of a Market (Facebook).

The Marketing Calendar & Why You Need It

A Marketing Calendar. Just the name alone makes your blood run cold.

Didn’t you do all you could to get away from this kind of Corporate stuff?

What the heck do you want with a calendar, anyway? You’re your own boss, right?

Relax. What I’m about to tell you is pretty painless.

Use the calendar to time your various blog and article releases to make sure that you have new content out there on a regular basis.

That means that you have your name out there where it can be seen regularly, too. Seen by people like potential new as well as existing clients.

Now, how you set up such a tool is up to you. The easiest (and least expensive!) way for me is a Google Calendar, which I can access from any internet device available to me Worldwide.

Can’t forget it, can’t lose it, doesn’t matter if I’m travelling.

Just set up the dates in advance, write material in advance, then check for release date each day and viola! YOU are a consistent content creator on the way towards getting noticed!

Isn’t getting noticed what it’s all about?

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John Lewis is a freelance writer and editor for hire. Reach him at jlewis@aqualifeadventures.com . To see more of his product write-ups on LinkedIn, join the group Products In Search of A Market . On Facebook, join Products in Search of a Market (Facebook).